Category Archives: Alaska

Why I Love Winters in Alaska

I see on the news and social media a general hysteria about winter temperatures and conditions in the Lower 48, and I chuckle to myself a bit. We wish we had winter like that up here, we Alaskans generally say to ourselves. Winter is the off season for tourism in Alaska, unless you include tourism related to the aurora borealis. And most out-of-state photographers do not bother to come here in the winter. It is fine with me that fewer people visit here, including photographers, in the wintertime. It helps me to enjoy this amazing season even more.

2017 In Review

I saw a lot of travel in 2017, so it would be impossible to cover all of my favorite images from the year. But, I found fifteen images that I think represent a good sampling of some of my favorite images from the year. Read further and enjoy!

New Age of Aurora Viewing

Fifteen years ago, aurora chasing was a lonely exploit, fueled by passion, skill and luck. Today, the influx of digital photography and proliferation of social media and apps have changed the nature of the game, making it much more communal and interactive. This piece explores how different of a world aurora chasing is today.

Anatomy of an Aurora Hunt

There is a lot of planning and effort that goes into a night of aurora chasing. This blog post explores a bit of what it takes to engage in this nocturnal adventure.

How to Chase and Shoot the Aurora like a Pro

In the “old days,” an aurora photographer would have to wait and watch for a good night, not knowing moment-to-moment when the aurora borealis would make a show. Film cameras added challenges, as you would not know that your shots turned out until the film came back from the lab days later. Nowadays, there are a variety of tools available to help predict, chase and shoot the aurora. This blog covers highlights of everything you need to know about chasing and shooting the aurora in the modern age.

“Where were you when …?” Remembering 9/11 in Denali

If you have lived long enough, you recall times in our lives, shared moments of profound history, when you remember where you were and what you were doing in those moments. With this blog post, I recall where I was on 9/11; enjoying my first trip to Denali National Park & Preserve.

All Creatures Great and Small

People have asked me how it is that I photograph something as massive as a polar bear but also as miniscule as a collared pika. In this post I discuss a bit about why that is and what it takes to cover a broad range of wildlife as a photographer.

​EPA Should Stand its Ground and Protect the World’s Greatest Salmon Runs

The Bristol Bay watershed in southwest Alaska produces nearly half of all the world’s Sockeye salmon supply, supporting 14,000 jobs and a $1.5 billion annual industry. It is also the cultural, spiritual and nutritional heart of the 8,000 residents of the region. It is also the home to a massive copper and gold deposit, which could someday boast the largest open pit mine in North America – at the headwaters of the most productive salmon streams in the region. In 2014, the EPA determined that it would impose severe restrictions on any mine, if built, in order to protect the valuable habitat. But on July 11, 2017, the new EPA took the first step to rescind those protections. Read more to learn the full story and what you can do to speak up for this incredible ecosystem.

An Alaskan’s Destination: the Sheldon Mountain House

For people around the world, Alaska is on their bucket list for travel destinations. But what’s on the bucket list for Alaskans? If you ask around, one name might come up time and again – the Sheldon Mountain House. Well, after years of dreaming to go there, this Alaskan finally knocked that destination off his list.

Familiarity in Iceland: Flowers

During our first trip to Iceland in the summer, we were frequently faced with a feeling of familiarity to our home in Alaska. One of the things that stood out the most was the species of wildflowers present about the landscape.