Carl’s Blog

photographic journeys with stories


Why the Long Reflection?

  I was recently giving a webinar through the North American Nature Photography Association on how to chase and photograph the aurora borealis. During the Q&A, someone asked why one image had stars that were casting a long reflection, rather than a pinpoint of light. I could not quite visualize the issue, and, to be…

Developing the gallery

Along time ago, in a career far, far away, I had a small gallery downtown. It was at at a time when I was doing any kind of photography work that would pay – commercial, portraits, weddings, sports, events. Nature photography was where my passion truly bloomed, and that is why I wanted to have…

The Elusive Ermine

Our home on the Anchorage hillside is just about as wild as you can get while still being only a ten-minute drive from the nearest grocery store (the Huffman Carrs). Zoned in what is called an R-6 area, properties are required to have a minimum lot size of an acre. Ours is 1 1/4 acres….

Why go all the way to Sweden?

It seems like every time I go to Sweden to photograph dog mushing, I get this question. It started last year when Michelle and I went to Slussfors, Sweden to go on a backcountry dog mushing trip with Petter Karlsson Sleddogs. We were their first visitors from Alaska. And this year, when I returned, I had a few people ask me again, “You have dog mushing in Alaska. Why come all the way to Sweden?” I suppose that is a good question.

Star trails, old and new ways

Photographing the night sky has long been a part of the landscape photographer’s experience. One of the creative ways to express the night sky is to create an image of star trails, a result of the Earth rotating against the constant position of the stars. This blog post explores the traditional ways to create star trail images, as well as some new tools.

Why I Love Winters in Alaska

I see on the news and social media a general hysteria about winter temperatures and conditions in the Lower 48, and I chuckle to myself a bit. We wish we had winter like that up here, we Alaskans generally say to ourselves. Winter is the off season for tourism in Alaska, unless you include tourism related to the aurora borealis. And most out-of-state photographers do not bother to come here in the winter. It is fine with me that fewer people visit here, including photographers, in the wintertime. It helps me to enjoy this amazing season even more.

2017 In Review

I saw a lot of travel in 2017, so it would be impossible to cover all of my favorite images from the year. But, I found fifteen images that I think represent a good sampling of some of my favorite images from the year. Read further and enjoy!

New Age of Aurora Viewing

Fifteen years ago, aurora chasing was a lonely exploit, fueled by passion, skill and luck. Today, the influx of digital photography and proliferation of social media and apps have changed the nature of the game, making it much more communal and interactive. This piece explores how different of a world aurora chasing is today.

Anatomy of an Aurora Hunt

There is a lot of planning and effort that goes into a night of aurora chasing. This blog post explores a bit of what it takes to engage in this nocturnal adventure.

How to Chase and Shoot the Aurora like a Pro

In the “old days,” an aurora photographer would have to wait and watch for a good night, not knowing moment-to-moment when the aurora borealis would make a show. Film cameras added challenges, as you would not know that your shots turned out until the film came back from the lab days later. Nowadays, there are a variety of tools available to help predict, chase and shoot the aurora. This blog covers highlights of everything you need to know about chasing and shooting the aurora in the modern age.